English Composition

Clemson University

ENGL 1030 Course Description

This course focuses on writing and critical thinking by using an approach that teaches rhetorical strategies for reading and composing arguments in both print and digital environments. Students will learn to read texts critically and to recognize the different purposes and audiences for arguments. Students will compose five writing projects based on issues and research raised in the reading assignments and class discussions during the semester. The writing assignments will give students extensive practice in thinking critically and writing according to the rhetorical conventions of an argumentative essay using the full range of writing processes—invention, arrangement, drafting, revising, editing, and proofreading—for multiple assignments. We will explore the uses of rhetoric as a tool of persuasion in written, visual, and multimodal texts.  We will learn how rhetoric works through attention to persona, audience, and persuasive appeals (such as pathos, logos, ethos, kairos).  Rhetoric teaches us how we might persuade others, and whether to be persuaded ourselves. To these ends, we will pay particular attention to cultural and individual assumptions, and how rhetoric and language work to provide effective arguments. These approaches build a foundation for learning strategies of writing about the world in which we all work and live.

The “source material” of this course will range from BTS (방탄소년단) to Star Wars, from Star Trek to professional wrestling, from Dancing with the Stars to Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. From hashtags to fan projects and from music videos to reaction videos, we will explore the ways that contemporary popular culture and fandom cross perceived boundaries through digital mediation while also considering the cultural, political, social, and economic issues present in such media “convergence.” The projects for this course engage each of the modes that might include, but will not be limited to, discussion board posts, Twitter conversations, the creation of transformative works, and analysis of social media circulation. Through engaging with a diverse range of media not only limited to academic theory, we will ourselves engage in transnational media, placing ourselves into dialogue with source materials while mediating our interactions through various modes of communication. The course will employ both lecture and workshop teaching approaches.

Click here to access the Clemson University Fall 2019 course website.


Georgia Tech

ENGL 1101 Course Description

In this course, we utilized Georgia Tech’s WOVEN (written, oral, visual, electronic, and nonverbal) mode-based curriculum to engage in critical thinking, articulate clear communication, and foster rhetorical awareness. Particularly, this course focused on transnational popular culture mediated within what Henry Jenkins defines as a “convergence culture.” With the contemporary influence of social media and the constant engagement of worldwide fan communities, the lines between corporate and grassroots digital and material production is blurred, resulting in interaction between “the power of the media producer and the power of the consumer.” This includes the definition of community, the creation and dissemination of media, and the constant conversation taking place through (social) media platforms.

The “source material” of this course ranged from BTS (방탄소년단) to Star Wars, from Star Trek to professional wrestling, from Dancing with the Stars to Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. From hashtags to fan projects and from music videos to reaction videos, we explored the ways that contemporary popular culture and fandom cross perceived boundaries through digital mediation while also considering the cultural, political, social, and economic issues present in such media “convergence.” The projects for this course engaged each of the WOVEN modes that might include, but will not be limited to, discussion board posts, Twitter conversations, the creation of transformative works, and analysis of social media circulation. Through engaging with a diverse range of media not only limited to academic theory, we will ourselves engage in transnational media, placing ourselves into dialogue with source materials while mediating our interactions through WOVEN modes of communication. The course will employ both lecture and workshop teaching approaches.

Click here to access the Georgia Tech Fall 2017 course website.  (Course websites are currently inaccessible due to change in institution.)

Click here to access the Georgia Tech Fall 2018 course website. (Course websites are currently inaccessible due to change in institution.)